Taken 18-Sep-12
Visitors 3137


1 of 33 photos
Thumbnails
Info
Categories & Keywords

Category:
Subcategory:
Subcategory Detail:
Keywords:
Photo Info

Dimensions7414 x 5580
Original file size40.1 MB
Image typeJPEG
Color spacesRGB
Date taken18-Sep-12 09:01
Date modified18-Sep-12 09:01
Shooting Conditions

Camera makePhase One
Camera modelP45+
Exposure0.5s at f/NA
ISO speedISO 100
Kevin O'Leary

Kevin O'Leary

About The Artist
Kevin O'Leary began his artistic and entrepreneurial career as an Arriflex cameraman for Special Event Television, a company he co-founded in the early 1980's.
The sale of that company seeded the genesis of SoftKey Software Products and eventually The Learning Company which was sold to Mattel for $4.2 billion in 1999.

Today Kevin O'Leary is an entrepreneur, investor, photographer and guitarist. He is the Chairman of O’Leary Funds and O’Shares ETFs and a member of the 108 year old Boston based Hamilton Trust. Kevin is an investor on ABC’s two time Emmy Award wining Shark Tank. He is a contributor to CNBC, CTV, BNN, ABC News and Good Morning America and a co-host for Discovery Channel's Project Earth. He is the founder of O'Leary Fine Wines and the author of three #1 international best selling books, the “Cold Hard Truth”, “Men, Women and Money” and "Family, Kids and Money".

Throughout his career he has always had a camera by his side.

For more information, visit www.kevinoleary.com and follow @kevinolearytv.

About the "Irreconcilable Images" Exhibit
I bought my first camera, a Soviet made Zenit-E SLR, in 1970. I still have the first roll of black and white 35 millimeter film that I developed and the images I printed from it, scratches and all. The smell of developer and fixer from the countless hours I have spent in darkrooms is still imprinted in my brain.

As an investor and television host I have traveled the world and have had many unique opportunities to capture images.

I love to find objects that seem to be out of place in their surroundings. I call them "irreconcilable" because viewing the work alerts your sense of foreboding and you are suspicious of what you are seeing. The eye keeps trying to reconcile the imputed inaccuracies. To me that is the hallmark of a great image that remains timeless. The work in this exhibit spans multiple decades and geographies but each image is irreconcilable in its own way.

Profits from the sale of these photographs will go to the Perry J. Cohen Foundation (www.pjcf.org) to support teenage entrepreneurs.